Put Vinegar on Your Plants and This Will Happen

Not everyone knows about all the amazing uses and benefits of vinegar. We at Bright Side discovered that you can safely use this ingredient in the garden too.

So here are a few properties which make vinegar irreplaceable for every garden.

How to use vinegar in the garden

Stop spending money on unnatural chemicals to get rid of weeds. Instead, try pouring vinegar on the weed. The acetic acid in the vinegar will stop the weed’s growth and will not damage the soil. A mix of 1 part vinegar with 1 part water will keep ants and rodents out of your garden. You can also add 2 tablespoons of vinegar and one teaspoon of sugar to the water in a vase of fresh flowers. Your bouquet will stay fresh much longer.

Not only can vinegar replace expensive chemicals in the garden, it can also be used instead of cleaning and disinfecting products for a toilet.

How to use vinegar at home

This is a simple but effective way to help make your bathroom cleaner and safer. To clean external dirt and disinfect the toilet with vinegar, you’ll need:

  • A glass of 9% vinegar
  • Baking soda or iodine solution

Use with soda (enhanced effect):

Heat a glass of vinegar to 40°C, and then mix it with the soda (iodine). For 200 grams (7 oz) of vinegar, you’ll need 1 tablespoon of soda. If you use iodine, the proportion is 1:1. Pour the resulting mixture into the toilet tank for several hours. It’s better to do this in the evening so that the solution remains in the object you’re cleaning for the whole night. To improve the result, you can repeat the process several times.

Use without soda:

Empty the water tank, and close the tap. Wipe the internal surface of the tank with a dry cloth, and apply a cloth moistened with vinegar to the stained area. After 2-6 hours, you can clean the dirt with a scraper (not metal).

What vinegar does

  • Dissolves limescale
  • Cleans metal parts from rust
  • Evaporating itself, vinegar removes unpleasant odors
  • Dissolves kidney stones
  • Kills shigella bacteria (causative agent of dysentery) and E.coli